Fly Tying Articles

The complete guide to dubbing!

THE DUBBING LOOP


This is the traditional dubbing loop. It is a stronger dubbing loop than the split thread loop because you are effectively forming a loop of two threads thickness, as opposed to the split thread loop where you split a single thread. Its obvious advantage is its strength, making it ideal for coarser or bulkier dubbings. Its one real disadvantage is that because you are effectively doubling the thread thickness, bulk can become an issue, though in most situations the issue is very minor. After forming the loop the techniques involved in applying the dubbing are identical to the split thread loop.
For this technique you will need a dubbing whorl, shown here. This tool is used to spin the loop, doing the job the bobbin does in the split thread loop.

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To form the loop..

Wrap the thread to the mid point of the hook shank, then lengthen the amount of thread from the bobbin to the hook, take it round your finger(s) and back up to the hook.

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Then continue wrapping the thread down (to the left) the hook shank, trapping both legs of the loop as you go.

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When you reach the point where you want the dubbing loop to be, stop wrapping and take the loop in your other hand.

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Then take the working thread and wrap it once round the loop next to the hook shank. This closes the loop at the hook shank.

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Now attach the dubbing whorl to the loop and you’re ready to use the loop.

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At this point I normally hang one leg of the loop over the star wheel of my vice to keep it open, using the weight of the whorl to keep a tension on the loop. If you leave it to just hang it will invariable spin of its own accord, you will then have to unspin it. A minor inconvenience, but an inconvenience all the same and easily avoided.

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As said above, the techniques used to apply the dubbing to the dubbing loop are identical to the split thread loop.

Here I have applied seal’s fur to one leg of the loop.

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As before, remove your fingers and the loop closes.

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Now spin the dubbing whorl.

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And the dubbing rope is formed.

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Now wrap your dubbing rope to form the body. When you reach the end of the body tie the dubbing rope off the same as you would any other material.

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The body finished and the rope tied off.

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In this sequence I have inserted a small seals fur dubbing noodle into the loop.

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Then spun the whorl to form the dubbing rope.

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Finally, wrapping and tying off the rope.

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Some more ideas for you to mull over and amuse yourself with.

Here I tied in 3 peacock herls then twisted them round one leg of the loop and applied a pinch of peacock Orvis Spectrablend to the other leg. Then spun them and wrapped the resultant rope to form an interesting body.

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One final idea for you.

Here I have twist dubbed some fiery brown flash bright onto one leg and on the other leg I have twist dubbed black and orange seal’s fur.

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Then spun the loop to form the rope, and wrapped to form the body.

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Then a rub with Velcro, and..

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