Fly Tying Articles

The complete guide to dubbing!

Preparing Dubbing.

There are various ways of preparing your dubbing. Below I have outlined some of the most common methods. I am only showing you how to prepare them here and a few examples of flies tied with the prepared dubbing. Their application is shown in separate step by steps.

Natural Furs.
The main technique for harvesting natural fur is by using a dubbing rake. There are many dubbing rakes available ready made. You can also make one yourself using a hacksaw blade attached to a piece of Dowling, or similar. I personally use commercially available ones. My weapon of choice being the “Ceramiscrape” made by Lawrence Waldron.

Pictured here are a Stonefly dubbing rake, a Ken Newton dubbing rake and the “Ceramiscrape.” The first two do the job very well, the “Ceramiscrape” is, in my opinion, exceptional.

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Using a dubbing rake is a simple process.

Simply draw the rake (under pressure) across the fur, following the direction that the fur lays.
I have shown you here on a Fox Squirrel skin, but the process is the same on all skins.

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After two or three draws you will have a decent amount of ready mixed dubbing.

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Here in close up you can see the blend of underfur and spikey guard hairs achieved.

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This is mole using the same technique.

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If you don’t have a dubbing rake, another technique you can use on mole is to scrape a razor blade over the fur. Razor blades are sharp, exorcise extreme caution when using!

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The result

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Seal’s Fur dubbing almost always come ready to use, but in some cases the staple length of the fur is too long.

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The “fix” is simply a case of tearing it a few times between your fingers.

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You will then be left with a more manageable medium.

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Other dubbing mediums

Wool

As well as normal dubbing mediums such as animal furs and purpose made synthetic dubbing you can also use a range of mediums found in the average flytying kit and/or sewing/knitting box.
Most of these mediums will need some simple preparation before you can use them.
One of the most common items available is wool. It comes in a variety of colours, is cheap and easy to use.

To prepare the wool you will need the following. A fine toothed comb and a pair of scissors.
The comb shown is a nit comb I purchased from Boots for this job.

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Now simply comb the wool to separate the strands. Do a small section at a time, if you try to do too much it will get stuck.

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Once you’ve combed it a few times it will look like this.

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Remove it from the comb.

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Then cut it in to short to medium lengths.

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Finally, work it a little in your fingers and it’s ready to use.

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Whilst combing some of the fibres will stick in the comb.

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Pull these out and work in your fingers as well.

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Shown here is a fly dubbed with a body of black wool prepared using the technique shown.

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You can also use the same technique on other mediums as well.

Shown here is a trainer shoe lace prepared in the same way.

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Here is one tied with the prepared shoe lace used as the dubbing.

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You can also use mediums such as floss and mending yarn. These don’t need combed. Simply cut into short to medium, varying lengths, then after working a little in your fingers they are ready to use.

Floss.

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A fly tied with a dubbed floss body.

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Mending Yarn.

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A fly tied with a dubbed mending yarn body.

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Z-Lon.

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A fly tied with a body of touch dubbed Z-Lon.

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As you can see the materials you can use are almost limitless. By using the simple techniques shown here you can turn almost any medium into a usable dubbing.

 

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